Video 1 title

This is an example of a Vimeo video, just edit the change the video link, edit the title and this description and if you like, you can also link the continue button to a web page....

Video 2 title

This is an example of a Vimeo video, just edit the change the video link, edit the title and this description and if you like, you can also link the continue button to a web page....

Video 3 title

This is an example of a Vimeo video, just edit the change the video link, edit the title and this description and if you like, you can also link the continue button to a web page....

Video 4 title

This is an example of a Vimeo video, just edit the change the video link, edit the title and this description and if you like, you can also link the continue button to a web page....

image1 image2 image3 image4

DDWSF

Busy finding leaders for tomorrow....

Scholarships

DDWSF has granted 234 scholarships
to college bound high school seniors

DDWSF

We earn a living by what we do;
we earn a life by what we give

DDWSF

Busy finding leaders for tomorrow....

image1 image2 image3 image4
themed object
Lend a hand wherever you can!
Bookmark and Share
get in touch

 

Welcome

Welcome the David & Dovetta Wilson Scholarship Fund's new website.

New Umbrella Awards

The David & Dovetta Wilson Scholarship Fund is pleased to announce new umbrella awards:
The Kathlena Wilson Legacy Award
The Judith E. Hibbert Memorial Award
The Jordan T. Wilson "Heroes" Award

Recipients

Announcing our 2016 Student Scholarship Recipients

 

Working TOGETHER

 

The Wilsons of New York share a big ambition. With $1,000 donations, 9 kids are . . .


Creating A Living Legacy

 

The nine children of David and Dovetta Wilson gave birth to a tradition that honors their past and nods toward the future a scholarship fund set up in their parents' name.
All recently gathered with their mother at the Staten Island, N.Y., home of Bernard Wilson, 38, chaplain for Naval Station New York. Six still live within 30 miles of their childhood home in Harlem. The others are sprinkled around the country.

But distance is no barrier to communication. The brothers and sisters meet by conference call monthly to discuss the David & Dovetta Scholarship Fund, established last year. They grant nine scholarships, representing each of the siblings, to students educated at public schools who demonstrate qualities their parents instilled in them: a sense of dignity, concern for community, faith and a desire for excellence in education.

They started by contributing $1,000 each, and last May gave away about $3,000 in scholarships, ranging from $125 to $1,000.

"Dad had always stressed doing something in the community," says David jr., 48, who owns five Hallmark stores in New York and Baltimore.
David Sr. died at age 70 in 1985. He had been a trackman for the New York City Transit Authority and had finished through the eighth grade in South Carolina, Dovetta Wilson, 68, a cafeteria aide, went as far as the fifth grade in Alabama. Yet among their children, seven have four-year college degrees, five have post-graduate degrees and two are graduates of business institutes.

The path the Wilson brothers and sisters chose led from a small three-bedroom apartment in a Harlem housing project. David and Dovetta Wilson ran a strict household. The children's outdoor playing hours were restricted; TV was limited to an hour a night. And their mother kept them busy cleaning house, says Carolyn Blair, 28, an actress. "On Saturdays, we would wash walls and clean closets. We had the cleanest walls in the projects. We would rather go to school than stay home, because Mom would make us wash something."
A strong influence was the Revival Temple Church of God in Christ in Harlem, which they attended every night and all day on Sundays. "We would go to church on Friday night," says Amelia Mullen, a 45-year-old teacher in Brooklyn, "and stay on our knees until Sunday."
Education was equally stressed. "Each kid had to give our parents a high school diploma," says Ruby Waluyn, 34, a senior trainer at New York Life. "That was like payment for growing up in a house and having good food and good shelter."

Bernard sometimes speaks of his father as if in awe. "My father had a city job, but he managed to feed all of us. There were 11 people in that house, but we were never left wanting. And when someone else would
come along, he'd just say, 'Add more water to the soup.' "
The Wilsons are motivated by a desire to help others, but the fund also makes financial sense, says Stan Chadsey, president of Capital Planning Associates in New York City. "It's fully sheltered," he says. "There is also the income tax deduction, and no gift tax because there's an unlimited charitable deduction for gifts."
Next year, the Wilsons hope to award nine $1,000 scholarships to students around the country. "It does seem awfully altruistic, but we are giving back," says Charles, 33.
Dovetta Wilson, 68, sits through all this, nodding silently and smiling, clearly proud of her children. "You can search all over the world, and you cannot find any children like these. I hope one day they'll be able to sit back and look at what I'm lookingat."


A final question: Do they all still go to church? Yes, Bernard says, "but not as long."

 

DO IT YOURSELF
The easiest way to establish a scholarship is to contact schools directly. Tell the institution what achievement or need — academic, athletic, financial you want considered and in whose name the scholarship should be awarded. The school usually selects the recipient. There are two basic types of scholarships:


• Endowed scholarships in perpetuity require at least $10,000. The principal is invested, and the scholarship consists of the interest earned on the principal.


• Restricted scholarships often are made on a one-time basis and usually are donations of less than $10,000.
Never assume a small donation will be refused. Many schools, libraries and


By Leslie Ansley
8 USA WEEKEND

 

 

back to top